Dom Hemingway

Dom Hemingway

Dom Hemingway (Jude Law) is an ace safe cracker who is finally released from prison after 12 years because he refused to rat on his accomplices. During that time, Dom’s wife has died of cancer (not before cheating on him first), his daughter has had a grandson, and those he protected have profited off of his suffering in prison. Dom immediately seeks out his old heist buddy Dickie Black (Richard E. Grant), who informs Dom that Mr. Fontaine (Demian Bichir), the man who Dom worked for, has monetary reparations prepared for Dom’s closed lips. But Dom’s fortunes change quickly after a car accident involving all three men and two prostitutes, as Mr.

Winter in the Blood

Winter in the Blood

Adapted from James Welch’s 1974 novel, Winter in the Blood feels as if it has captured the difficult concepts and settings that only the written word can faithfully convey. Balancing a fragmented and distorted timeline of events with the quiet desperation surrounding the struggles of identity, Winter in the Blood includes plenty of moments to provoke laughs with its unapologetic dark humor under the most morbid circumstances.

Teddy Bears

Even with the ridiculously awkward premise, Teddy Bears is not nearly as original as one might think. A spat of indies about sexual revolution among groups of friends have littered film festivals and Netflix queues for years. Yet, somehow this film tends to remain funny with quippy dialogue and solemn self-discovery among everyone in the group.

The Boys of Abu Ghraib

The Boys of Abu Ghrai

It is rather surprising to see who truly breaks from the torture first in The Boys of Abu Ghraib, a film based on the events leading up to the breaking of the 2005 Abu Ghraib prison scandal, as well as the broader national topic of advanced interrogation techniques. Written, directed, and staring Luke Moran, a relatively unknown actor, the film is surprising well done. The Boys of Abu Ghraib bears an intellectual side as it portrays the context of these soldiers’ abuses without forgiving them.

There's Always Woodstock

There's Always Woodstock

Life must be rough when you have the chance to run away from the hectic, heartless city life to the quiet vistas of Woodstock, NY. Audiences have the opportunity to join in the disparity in There’s Always Woodstock, where we witness the main character struggling to find herself in this feature-length debut from writer and director Rita Merson.

Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside Llewyn Davis

Folk singers are a lot like cats, loners by nature, but striving for affection on their own terms. They know they are intellectually better than others, but reliant on the kindness of strangers and friends alike to survive. Inside Llewyn Davis captures one week in the life of the eponymous character, who wanders from couch to couch, enjoying free meals as he juggles his rock-bottom career, hapless love, and an endless cat and mouse game where he is the cat, and a cat is the mouse.

>86th Academy Awards Post-Mortem

This is my best year ever with Oscar predictions. I got 22 out of 24 correct this year, giving me a 91% success rate. Not to knock my skills, this was an incredibly easy year. Gravity, which is most certainly a technical achievement, destroyed most of the technical categories.

My incorrect predictions came down solely to the short film categories, which are notoriously difficult to predict due to the lack of information and since most of the films are not easily watchable.

>86th Academy Awards Predictions

Last year I spent an enormous time trying to develop my own system to guess the Oscar winners. Because of an unexpected, and incredibly rare tie, I either got 68.75% or 70% correct last year, which is not bad. This year, I haven’t spent as much time on my predictions since most of the data I collected was already waiting for me.

>The Dangers of Satire

There is no hiding it, cinema is almost always going to glorify the worst of humanity for entertainment, even if the key ingredient is satire. Christina McDowell (formerly Christina Prousalis) wrote an open letter to The Wolf of Wall Street filmmakers to chide them for their glorified portrayal of Jordan Belfort and her father Tom Prousalis’s heinous financial practices.

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